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Each year, thousands of animals come to us in desperate need of healing and care, which skilled staff and volunteers at our five animal care centers provide. While the animals receive care and get a second chance at life, our campaigns work to end the intentional cruelty and accidental suffering that result in abuse and injury to animals in the first place. Learn more about our care centers—and meet the animals that your support allows us to rescue and save each year.  

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News from the Animal Care Centers

  • November 19, 2014

    Veterinary Externs, South Florida Wildlife Center

    Learn about wildlife medicine, husbandry and rehabilitation. Apply to be a veterinary extern at the South Florida Wildlife Center.

  • November 18, 2014

    Rotational Interns, South Florida Wildlife Center

    Learn about wildlife care, rehabilitation and medicine. Apply to intern with the South Florida Wildlife Center.

  • November 18, 2014

    Three Orphaned Bear Cubs Are Making a Full Recovery at FFAWC

    The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center in Ramona, California is used to caring for orphans of native predatory species like coyotes, bobcats and hawks. But they had never taken in an orphaned bear cub. Until now.

  • November 4, 2014

    Take a Hike for Wildlife

    Join The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center on Saturday, January 31 for their first annual wildlife hike-a-thon. The hike will take place at Poway Lake at all proceeds will benefit the work of the FFAWC.

  • October 31, 2014

    A Young Woodpecker Takes Flight Thanks to the SFWC

    Pileated woodpeckers are one of the most distinct forest birds in North America. As large as crows, with a bold white stripe down their neck and a flaming red crest, their unique look is hard to miss. Like all woodpeckers, they hunt for food by drilling holes in tree trunks and need to be very adept at flying between, climbing and gripping onto trees. So when a young pileated woodpecker was brought into the South Florida Wildlife Center with broken tail feathers and nails, we were concerned about his ability to feed and fend for himself.

More News from our Centers
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