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There are many ways that people can push wildlife populations toward extinction: destruction of habitat, pollution, hunting, and collection for food or sale to the pet, research, entertainment, or souvenir industries, etc. Fortunately, there are just as many ways that we can fight for these animals


Under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, an "endangered" species is one in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its natural habitat. A "threatened" species is one likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future.

Other federal laws protecting wild animals and their habitats include the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and the Wild Bird Conservation Act. States often have laws to protect imperiled species and the United States has signed many international agreements.

The HSUS is vigilant is assuring that laws are enforced and the species protected.


Trophy Hunting Wolves?

The Endangered Species Act is the only thing that stands between some wolves and sport hunters. Tell Interior Secretary Ken Salazar not to strip wolves of ESA protection.

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News & Events

  • April 8, 2014

    Reward Offered in Arkansas Alligator Shootings

    Local and national groups are seeking information leading to the identification, arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for illegally shooting two alligators at the Pond Creek National Wildlife Refuge.

  • March 11, 2014

    Reward Offered for Falcon Shooting in West Allis, Wisc.

    The Humane Society of the United States and The Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust are offering a $5,000 reward for information leading to the identification, arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for illegally shooting an endangered peregrine falcon in West Allis, Wisc.

  • January 6, 2014

    China Destroys Confiscated Ivory Stockpile

    China, the world’s largest market for ivory products, destroyed 6.1 tons of its confiscated stockpile. The momentous event occurred in Guangzhou, a southern port city and main transit and destination point in the global ivory trade.

  • December 20, 2013

    “Medicine of the Wolf” Wins Annual Filmmaking Grant

    “Medicine of the Wolf,” a documentary examining the treatment of America’s gray wolves, has won the eighth annual Animal Content in Entertainment documentary grant offered by The Humane Society of the United States.

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Our Victories

  • March 31, 2014

    Top UN Court Orders Japan to End Antarctic Whaling

    Statement on the ruling of the International Court of Justice that Japan’s whaling program is a breach of the global whaling moratorium and lacks scientific legitimacy in regard to the quotas set and the numbers taken.

  • February 14, 2014

    On Heels of Major Criminal Bust, Shark Fin Distributors Drop Lawsuit

    The California Department of Fish and Wildlife recently seized 2,000 pounds of illegal shark fins from a San Francisco merchant. That merchant is a part of an association whose members sold and distributed shark fins to restaurants and grocery stores and who had sued the State of California challenging the constitutionality of the state’s ban on the sale and trade of shark fins. In the wake of this major bust, the association has voluntarily dismissed its legal challenge.

  • January 6, 2014

    China Destroys Confiscated Ivory Stockpile

    China, the world’s largest market for ivory products, destroyed 6.1 tons of its confiscated stockpile. The momentous event occurred in Guangzhou, a southern port city and main transit and destination point in the global ivory trade.

  • September 13, 2013

    Remaining Rhino Species Gets Immediate Protection Under U.S. Law

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service immediately listed the southern white rhino as a threatened species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, giving the species greater protection from poaching. With two or three rhinos poached every day for their horns, conservationists believe that within a few years’ time, there will be no more rhinos in the wild in Africa.

More Victories
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