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August 30, 2011

After Hurricane Irene: Day 3

Our latest reports from the field

Animal Rescue Team Field Notes

Get up-to-the-minute pet information in the wake of Tropical Storm Irene on our Twitter pageUse #Irenepets hashtag for the latest. | Donate to help animals affected by Irene and other natural disasters

 

 


 

UPDATED Aug. 30, 9:10 p.m. EDT

From Dr. Bob Aguilar with the Cape Wildlife Center:

 

 

As the day comes to an end, power has come back to the center. Externs and volunteers continue to feed and care for the dozens of orphans and patients brought in after the storm. Their constant care and support has been our first concern. A total of eight patients were brought in today. Most were injured adult bird and orphaned squirrels.


UPDATED Aug. 30, 5:25 p.m. EDT

From our Animal Rescue Team, on the ground in North Carolina:

We started field rescue this morning in Pamlico. We met with the local animal control officer, Berkley Hill, to develop a plan, and have six people in the field. HSUS response volunteers (NDARTS), Hello Bully dog rescue volunteers, and rescue team staff are continuing to set up the emergency shelter.

To give some context of the devastation in Pamlico County, thousands of people have lost their homes, and there is no running water or electricity. The National Guard and local fire department are delivering food, but the need is so great that yesterday they ran out before delivering to many families. As Berkley said, the county has lost its entire infrastructure. 

Today we brought in six dogs, three cats, a parrot and a turtle to our shelter—a total of 27 animals, and we’ve just begun. The red hound dog we rescued on Sunday was reunited with her owner, and the owner has also agreed to let us take care of his horse at our emergency shelter. 

SLIDESHOW: Animal response along the East Coast

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Our NDARTS and volunteers from Hello Bully are doing an incredible job. They came here to help in a dogfighting raid, and they’ve ended up enduring the storm in a hotel that lost electricity. They have been caring for the dogs for weeks, and yesterday they worked incredibly hard setting up the emergency shelter. They really are amazing, selfless people. 


 

 

UPDATED Aug. 30, 3:00 p.m. EDT

From Joanne Bourbeau, senior state director for Vermont and New Hampshire:

The Red Cross shelter serving the Wilmington, Vt., area allowed some residents to bring their animals, but they couldn't stay long term. Area resident Charles Green moved into our emergency shelter with his three cats and his parrot.

The HSUS’s emergency shelter near Brattleboro, Vt. is still being used to house dogs seized in a recent puppy mill raid. We’ve made that shelter available to house animals displaced by the floods brought on by Hurricane Irene.

The HSUS Animal Rescue Team is working with municipal, Red Cross, and National Guard officials in Wilmington, Vt. We’re also partnering with the Vermont Companion Animal Neutering Clinic to assist people who have had to evacuate their homes because of historic flooding in the state, particularly in Wilmington.

Already the shelter is caring for a number of pets brought in by families who had nowhere to go with their animals—three of our temporary residents are cats who belong to a woman who was recently hospitalized. We will continue to be open to other families who may need a safe place as the impact of the flooding continues to be felt.

With the support of the Vermont Companion Animal Neutering Clinic, The HSUS is offering to provide pet food and supplies to evacuated families from the local area. We’ve also offered to take part in search and rescue with the National Guard. In Wilmington, which suffered devastating flooding, we plan to set live traps for cats who’ve been displaced and are in need of care.


UPDATED Aug. 30, 9:40 a.m. EDT
VIDEO: Our Animal Rescue Team rescued 11 hounds in pens who needed help. They clearly lived through significant flooding and appeared emaciated and dehydrated.

 


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See yesterday's field notes, photos»

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