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December 7, 2010

Washington States A Preference for Cage-Free Eggs

Blue Star Café and Pub is the latest to change its policy

  • The switch to cage-free eggs means fewer restrictions for hens. iStockphoto

Popular Seattle restaurant Blue Star Café and Pub has joined the growing movement away from battery cages, prompting praise from The HSUS.

After working with Karin Olsson, outreach manager for The HSUS' factory farming campaign, the restaurant is switching all the 200,000 eggs it serves each year to cage-free.

"Easy and ethical"

Blue Star Café and Pub restaurant manager Wendy Morales stated, "We're excited about our new exclusive cage-free policy. Sustainability and animal welfare are important to us as well as to our customers, so making the switch to cage-free eggs was an easy and ethical decision."

"It was a pleasure working with the Blue Star Café and Pub on developing their new policy, which will make a meaningful difference in the lives of egg-laying hens," Olsson said. "By moving away from eggs from caged hens, Blue Star Café and Pub has taken an important stand against one of the most inhumane factory farming abuses, and we hope other restaurants will follow its lead."

Movement taking hold in Washington and elsewhere 

Blue Star Café and Pub joins dozens of other popular restaurants in Washington State that are using exclusively cage-free eggs, including Ethan Stowell Restaurants, Alexa's Café, Toulouse Petit, Heavy Restaurant Group, and John Howie Restaurants. Numerous schools like the University of Washington and Evergreen College use cage-free eggs in their cafeterias, as do local hospitals like United General Hospital and MultiCare Health Systems.

The progress in Washington State is part of a national movement away from eggs from caged hens. Retailers across the country have enacted similar policies, California and Michigan have passed laws to outlaw the cage confinement of hens, and California passed a law requiring all whole eggs used in the state to be cage-free by 2015.

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