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October 28, 2011

Wildlife Sanctuary Established near Brushy Creek, Texas

The Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust has received multiple conservation easements to protect a total of 563 acres near Brushy Creek, Texas, as permanent wildlife habitat.

Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust

The Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust has received multiple conservation easements to protect a total of 563 acres near Brushy Creek, Texas, as permanent wildlife habitat. The collective acreage is now called the Daisy Wildlife Sanctuary, named for Daisy Morris Rabb, who once owned large sections of the sanctuary.

Among the wildlife found here are white-tailed deer, bobcats, coyotes, wild turkeys and beavers. A tremendous variety of birds, from hawks to songbirds to ducks, can be found here as year-round residents and migratory visitors. The landowners involved with this project have invested years of work in the sanctuary’s wetlands and forested areas.

“The goal is to restore and improve the habitat to what it once looked like about 150 years ago and preserve it in perpetuity,” said Joel Rabb, Daisy’s grandson. “Creating this permanent safe haven for wildlife is a major part of the effort to continue to preserve and enhance Daisy Rabb’s gift and her legacy.”

“Habitat loss and fragmentation endangers the existence of large wildlife populations, and, in many cases, entire species,” said Robert Koons, executive director of HSWLT. “The Daisy Wildlife Sanctuary is now part of our network of more than 100 permanent wildlife sanctuaries in the United States and Canada for the benefit of all free-roaming animals.”

The establishment of the sanctuary was made possible with the cooperation and commitment of the landowners: Bobbie Jean Areen, Della Ging, Daniel and Beth Northcut, Mary Northcut, the late Clinton Rabb, Joel and Beth Rabb, Robert and Tina Rabb, Suzanne Rabb and the Brushy Creek Wetlands, LLC.

Without adequate habitat, wildlife lacks the shelter, food and security necessary to survive. Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust sanctuaries serve as “Shelters without Walls®” for free-roaming animals.

 

Media Contact: Stephanie Twining, 301-258-1491, stwining@humanesociety.org

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