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The only mammals who can both flap their wings and fly, bats play a key role in pollinating our crops and controlling insect populations in our neighborhoods.

Animal

Every day, more and more wildlife habitat is lost to the spread of development. Give a little back by building your own humane backyard! It doesn't matter whether you have a small apartment balcony, a townhouse with a sliver of ground, a suburban yard, a sprawling corporate property or a community...

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Hibernating bats have been dying in great numbers—90 to 100 percent of some colonies—from a disease known as White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), which causes a white fungus to appear on their noses, ears, wings, and tails. First discovered in 2006 near Albany, New York, WNS has spread rapidly across the...

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Bats, like any other mammal, can carry rabies, but the incidence of rabies in bat populations is extremely low. Most human exposures occur when someone accidentally or carelessly handles a bat or is unaware they have been bitten. The National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends...

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DIY painted bird baths made from clay pots

As a new homeowner susceptible to sales pitches from the garden industrial complex, I spent my early planting years salivating over glossy magazine spreads exploding with color and texture and promises of endless summers. “Flower porn” was how my husband described those lushly photographed...

Article
By Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener

With the right information and supplies, you may be able to solve some conflicts with wildlife by yourself. But when it’s time to call in a professional, here's how to find a humane, effective and ethical company. Ask for an inspection and written estimate It will be difficult for any company to...

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Photograph showing wildlife-friendly plantings in Janet and Jeff Crouch’s yard

The delegate seemed ready to pick a fight, already having mocked a proposed plastic bag ban and other pro-environment bills on the day’s agenda. As I finished my testimony in support of wildlife-friendly plantings, I steeled myself for a heated debate. But on that gray afternoon in February 2020...

Article
By Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener
Live animals in cages at a wet market in China

It began, almost certainly, in a bat. Then, just as SARS jumped to civets from bats, the virus that causes COVID-19 passed to another mammal, possibly a pangolin. Finally, late last year, the new coronavirus most likely jumped to humans in a wildlife market in Wuhan, China, a densely populated city...

Article
by Karen E. Lange
Bats hanging upside down in a cage at a wildlife market in Indonesia to be sold for food

In March, as people struggled to understand how the precursor of the virus that causes COVID-19 emerged from horseshoe bats in southern China and reached humans in the central city of Wuhan, Humane Society International policy specialist Peter Li fielded one question again and again: “Why do Chinese...

Article
By Karen E. Lange

Glue boards (also known as glue traps) might seem like a safe solution to ridding your home of uninvited guests of the crawling, flying or scurrying sort, but they are one of the cruelest.

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Photo illustration of a dim light bulb with illustrated butterflies

On summer evenings, my husband and I head to the darkest spot of our property to look for the light—in the form of fireflies rising from meadow grasses and twinkling their way into the trees. As the tulip poplars behind this spectacular display settle in for slumber, white yucca flowers open their...

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BY NANCY LAWSON, AUTHOR OF THE HUMANE GARDENER

If you find a wild animal in distress while you're out for a hike, traveling or even in your own backyard, get them the help they need. Find a wildlife rehabilitator in the alphabetical list below. IMPORTANT! Before you "rescue" any wild animal, make sure the animal really needs your help. Determine...

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Sometimes a bat may go off course and accidentally find their way into a home. This is no cause for alarm. Stay calm and follow these steps to remove them safely and humanely. The bat may be first seen flying around a room early in the evening, landing on curtains or furniture and then taking flight...

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Longtime Trust friend Fred Ziegler became the first founding member of the Humane Stewardship Alliance, pledging to follow humane stewardship principles in managing his nearly 2900 acres in Tennessee. With three streams and 1.5 miles of frontage along one of North America’s most biologically rich...

Press Release

Once you've humanely removed a bat from inside your house or evicted them from your attic, how can you keep bats from coming back indoors? Make sure they have plenty of places to live outdoors. Bats are gaining an appreciation for their ecological contributions as pollinators, seed dispersers and...

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This holiday season, the Humane Society of the United States is urging people to celebrate humanely—with gift-giving and festivities that make a difference for animals and the environment. Kitty Block, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, said, “The holiday season is an...

Press Release
three bats hanging upside down

They inhabit the ruins of a 14th-century empire in Africa, cling to 800-year-ol cliffside dwellings in Arizona, forage in old Indian temples and European churches and occupy the decidedly less grand crawl spaces of our modern homes. As the world’s only true flying mammals, bats know how to get...

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BY NANCY LAWSON, AUTHOR OF THE HUMANE GARDENER