Showing 20 of 64 results

The only mammals who can both flap their wings and fly, bats play a key role in pollinating our crops and controlling insect populations in our neighborhoods.

Animal

Once driven to the brink of extinction by the fur trade, beavers are finally making a comeback.

Animal

From the soaring eagles we watch from afar to the pet parakeets and canaries chirping in our homes ...

Animal

A symbol of beauty transformed from humble beginnings, butterflies are one of the few insects who garner near universal appreciation.

Animal

Undeniably adorable, chipmunks play a vital role in healthy ecosystems.

Animal

With their distinctive honks and propensity to graze on roadside grass, Canada geese are among the most ubiquitous of our wild neighbors.

Animal

These furry masked bandits probably hang out in your neighborhood—they’re amazing survivors and can thrive in all sorts of habitats.

Animal

Misunderstood skunks are gentle, near-sighted animals with one infamous—and pungent—defense mechanism.

Animal

Solitary creatures who prefer to be left alone, snakes have a bad reputation that doesn’t match their behavior.

Animal

Around the world, tree squirrels are among the most prolific—and fun to watch—backyard wildlife species.

Animal

Together, we can learn how to peacefully coexist with wild animals and support their natural habitats.

Fight

Every day, more and more wildlife habitat is lost to the spread of development. Give a little back by building your own humane backyard! It doesn't matter whether you have a small apartment balcony, a townhouse with a sliver of ground, a suburban yard, a sprawling corporate property or a community...

Resource
Illustration of a family of deer with New York City in the background

People in New York City expect to contend with millions of other humans. They don’t always realize that in some boroughs they also live side by side with thousands of bucks, does and fawns. So recently the city plastered its transit system with ads that carried pictures of these wild city residents...

Article
By Karen E. Lange

WASHINGTON—A majestic lion named Mopane was allegedly killed by an American hunter outside of Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe last week. Mopane’s death has sparked international outcry with details surrounding his killing similar to those of Cecil the lion, slaughtered in 2015 in the same area...

Press Release

Hibernating bats have been dying in great numbers—90 to 100 percent of some colonies—from a disease known as White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), which causes a white fungus to appear on their noses, ears, wings, and tails. First discovered in 2006 near Albany, New York, WNS has spread rapidly across the...

Resource

Bats, like any other mammal, can carry rabies, but the incidence of rabies in bat populations is extremely low. Most human exposures occur when someone accidentally or carelessly handles a bat or is unaware they have been bitten. The National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends...

Resource

Editor's note: The attribution of the quote contributed by the U.S. Forest Service was corrected on June 8. MERLIN, Ore.—The Wild and Scenic Lower Rogue River and Rogue River National Recreation Trail draw tens of thousands of visitors annually to enjoy recreational activities including rafting...

Press Release
Black bear walking down the street in Yellowstone

Meet the new neighbors—and surprise, they don’t want to eat you. As human and black bear populations expand and overlap, this native animal is under fire. But bear-friendly strategies show what can happen when we put down the guns and start cleaning up our acts. It was when Robert Scott ran into...

Article
Karen E. Lange
Photo illustration of a coyote with crosshairs over her face

WARNING: This page contains graphic content. On a Sunday evening in June, camo-clad men chat and laugh by pickups next to a restaurant near Billings, Montana. There is a faint but unmistakable odor of decay coming from a large trash bin across the parking lot—the just-weighed bodies of 29 coyotes...

Article
By Karen E. Lange

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Since the federal government turned management of gray wolves over to the states on January 4, 2021, these iconic and family-oriented animals have faced relentless persecution by trophy hunters and trappers. Yet, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland reaffirmed the Biden...

Press Release