Showing 16 of 16 results

The Humane Society of the United States and the Humane Society Legislative Fund are noted champions for the protection and well-being of the nation’s wild horses and burros, and we have strong policy and practical commitments to the humane management of their herds on America’s Western ranges. We...

Resource

Every day, more and more wildlife habitat is lost to the spread of development. Give a little back by building your own humane backyard! It doesn't matter whether you have a small apartment balcony, a townhouse with a sliver of ground, a suburban yard, a sprawling corporate property or a community...

Resource

WARNING: This page contains graphic content. What are wildlife killing contests? While contests like dogfighting and cockfighting have been condemned in the U.S. as barbaric and cruel, wildlife killing contests still happen regularly in almost all of the 43 U.S. states they are legal in. Killing...

Resource

Coyotes generally avoid humans, even when their home range encompasses largely urban or suburban habitat. However, the presence of a free buffet in the form of pet food or garbage can lure coyotes into suburban yards and create the impression that backyards are bountiful feeding areas. Without the...

Resource
Wild Neighbors (Adapted from the book)

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

Resource

With the right information and supplies, you may be able to solve some conflicts with wildlife by yourself. But when it’s time to call in a professional, here's how to find a humane, effective and ethical company. Ask for an inspection and written estimate It will be difficult for any company to...

Resource

If you see a coyote in the city or suburbs, don't be alarmed. Attacks on humans are very rare. Our tools will teach coyotes to keep their distance.

Resource

Coyotes generally avoid people. But if you encounter coyotes who have adapted to urban environments, hazing techniques can teach them to keep away.

Resource

Glue boards (also known as glue traps) might seem like a safe solution to ridding your home of uninvited guests of the crawling, flying or scurrying sort, but they are one of the cruelest.

Resource

If you find a wild animal in distress while you're out for a hike, traveling or even in your own backyard, get them the help they need. Find a wildlife rehabilitator in the alphabetical list below. IMPORTANT! Before you "rescue" any wild animal, make sure the animal really needs your help. Determine...

Resource

This list is provided as a resource for horse owners and is for informational purposes only. Please contact specific vendors for more information on their services. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of all listings. This list is not exhaustive and is subject to change over time. The...

Resource

A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

Resource

Conflicts between humans and wildlife are increasing as human populations and urbanization continue to expand globally. A number of additional factors increase the likelihood of human-wildlife interactions and those include wild animals adapting to and flourishing in urban areas, rural areas...

Resource

If a coyote is in your neighborhood If you spot a coyote in your neighborhood, relax: Most coyotes avoid people. “Seeing a coyote out during the day is not a cause for alarm, especially in the spring and summer when they’re looking for food for their pups,” says Lynsey White, HSUS director of humane...

Resource

Skunks are infamous producers of an odor so powerful that it quickly and easily communicates a clear message: “Don’t mess with me”

Resource
Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors