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1. Because you'll save a life. Each year, it's estimated that more than one million adoptable dogs and cats are euthanized in the United States, simply because too many pets come into shelters and too few people consider adoption when looking for a pet. The number of euthanized animals could be...

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The choice to spay or neuter your pet may be one of the most important decisions you make impacting their long-term health—and your wallet! Your pet's health and longevity The average lifespan of spayed and neutered cats and dogs is demonstrably longer than the lifespan of those not. A University of...

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Pet food and other necessities To locate a pet food pantry or other pet-related community service, explore an interactive resource map provided by Feeding Pets of the Homeless; just choose which resource you’re seeking under the “Get Help” listing on the right. Or contact your local shelter and...

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Goblin the tortoise walking on a concrete floor

Goblin might not have lasted much longer at Tim’s Reptiles and Exotics in Pulaski County, Kentucky. The sulcata tortoise was one of about 150 animals rescued in September from nightmarish conditions at the pet store when local police arrested the store operator on 19 counts of animal cruelty...

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By James Hettinger

Contents How does the HSUS help local animal shelters and rescue groups? What if I have a concern about my local shelter or rescue? Where can I adopt a pet? How can I volunteer to help animals? I need to find a new home for my pet. Where can I turn? What is the HSUS's position on use of the gas...

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Why are there so many rabbits in my neighborhood? There are several species of wild rabbits—most are Eastern cottontail rabbits—who live across most of North America. Cottontails like to live at the edges of open areas. In fact, they are rarely found in dense forests or open grassland. This love of...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

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Every day, more and more wildlife habitat is lost to the spread of development. Give a little back by building your own humane backyard! It doesn't matter whether you have a small apartment balcony, a townhouse with a sliver of ground, a suburban yard, a sprawling corporate property or a community...

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TEXAS–Summertime for the more than 700 tigers, primates, bears, horses, pigs and others living at the Cleveland Amory Black Beauty Ranch means splashing, swimming and lounging under shade trees and enjoying refreshing icy fruit pops. The residents living at the 1,400-acre sanctuary in Murchison...

Press Release

Together, we can learn how to peacefully coexist with wild animals and support their natural habitats.

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If you find a wild animal in distress while you're out for a hike, traveling or even in your own backyard, get them the help they need. Find a wildlife rehabilitator in the alphabetical list below. IMPORTANT! Before you "rescue" any wild animal, make sure the animal really needs your help. Determine...

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The woodchuck (a.k.a. groundhog) is often caught between being a celebrity and a villain—one day we rely on his shadow to forecast the seasons; the next day we grumble as he makes a meal of our carefully planted garden or digs up the yard.

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors
Fawn sitting in the grass.

The woman on the phone was anxious but determined. She was calling City Wildlife, a rescue and rehabilitation center in Washington, D.C., because her dog had dug up a rabbit nest and killed three of the babies. There was one survivor. “I’m going to get some kitten formula and start feeding it...

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Kelly L. Williams