Showing 19 of 19 results

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

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Every day, more and more wildlife habitat is lost to the spread of development. Give a little back by building your own humane backyard! It doesn't matter whether you have a small apartment balcony, a townhouse with a sliver of ground, a suburban yard, a sprawling corporate property or a community...

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If a coyote is in your neighborhood If you spot a coyote in your neighborhood, relax: Most coyotes avoid people. “Seeing a coyote out during the day is not a cause for alarm, especially in the spring and summer when they’re looking for food for their pups,” says Lynsey White, HSUS director of humane...

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Coyotes generally avoid humans, even when their home range encompasses largely urban or suburban habitat. However, the presence of a free buffet in the form of pet food or garbage can lure coyotes into suburban yards and create the impression that backyards are bountiful feeding areas. Without the...

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Wild Neighbors (Adapted from the book)

See the difference between cage-free egg production and battery-cage egg production.

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Glue boards (also known as glue traps) might seem like a safe solution to ridding your home of uninvited guests of the crawling, flying or scurrying sort, but they are one of the cruelest.

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If you see a coyote in the city or suburbs, don't be alarmed. Attacks on humans are very rare. Our tools will teach coyotes to keep their distance.

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Coyotes generally avoid people. But if you encounter coyotes who have adapted to urban environments, hazing techniques can teach them to keep away.

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Bats, like any other mammal, can carry rabies, but the incidence of rabies in bat populations is extremely low. Most human exposures occur when someone accidentally or carelessly handles a bat or is unaware they have been bitten. The National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends...

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Sometimes a bat may go off course and accidentally find their way into a home. This is no cause for alarm. Stay calm and follow these steps to remove them safely and humanely. The bat may be first seen flying around a room early in the evening, landing on curtains or furniture and then taking flight...

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There are more than 200 squirrel species, but you’ve most likely only seen the most common in North America: Grey and black squirrels. Squirrels are fascinating to watch, photograph and study, and unlike most wildlife, they aren’t shy! But their adaptable nature means they’re adept at finding the...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

If you find a wild animal in distress while you're out for a hike, traveling or even in your own backyard, get them the help they need. Find a wildlife rehabilitator in the alphabetical list below. IMPORTANT! Before you "rescue" any wild animal, make sure the animal really needs your help. Determine...

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Once you've humanely removed a bat from inside your house or evicted them from your attic, how can you keep bats from coming back indoors? Make sure they have plenty of places to live outdoors. Bats are gaining an appreciation for their ecological contributions as pollinators, seed dispersers and...

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With the right information and supplies, you may be able to solve some conflicts with wildlife by yourself. But when it’s time to call in a professional, here's how to find a humane, effective and ethical company. Ask for an inspection and written estimate It will be difficult for any company to...

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Conflicts between humans and wildlife are increasing as human populations and urbanization continue to expand globally. A number of additional factors increase the likelihood of human-wildlife interactions and those include wild animals adapting to and flourishing in urban areas, rural areas...

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There are more than 40 bat species in the U.S. and Canada, but only a few kinds of bats ever cause problems for people. No, bats won't suck your blood or get tangled in your hair—but they may take up residence in your attic to raise their young. Bats in houses can go unnoticed for years...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Large-scale animal agribusiness causes widespread suffering, but the consequences don’t end there. Here are even more reasons to reduce or eliminate animal products from our diets: Greenhouse gas explosion Many aspects of the meat, egg and dairy industries—not just the raising of animals, but feed...

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Hibernating bats have been dying in great numbers—90 to 100 percent of some colonies—from a disease known as White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), which causes a white fungus to appear on their noses, ears, wings, and tails. First discovered in 2006 near Albany, New York, WNS has spread rapidly across the...

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Choosing meat-free meals on Monday is a great way to look and feel better. It can be as simple as swapping chicken nuggets with a bean and rice burrito, putting pork chops aside in favor of a spicy three-bean chili or trying a veggie burger instead of a hamburger. The health benefits are clear...

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