Showing 20 of 34 results

Many people assume that coyotes don't live in suburban or urban neighborhoods because they don't see them. But that assumption can be dangerous for your animal companions. Coyotes typically hunt small mammals such as mice, voles and rabbits. If given the opportunity, they will also make a meal of a...

Resource
Wild Neighbors (Adapted from the book)

Coyotes deserve lives free from persecution.

Animal

You can help keep wild animals where they belong—in the wild.

Fight

Together, we can keep animals safe in their natural habitat.

Fight

Whales are awe-inspiring giants of the sea.

Animal

The public display industry keeps many species of marine mammals captive in concrete tanks, especially whales and dolphins. The Humane Society of the United States believes that these animals are best seen in their natural coastal and ocean environments instead of being held captive simply to...

Resource

If a coyote is in your neighborhood If you spot a coyote in your neighborhood, relax: Most coyotes avoid people. “Seeing a coyote out during the day is not a cause for alarm, especially in the spring and summer when they’re looking for food for their pups,” says Lynsey White, HSUS director of humane...

Resource

Coyotes generally avoid humans, even when their home range encompasses largely urban or suburban habitat. However, the presence of a free buffet in the form of pet food or garbage can lure coyotes into suburban yards and create the impression that backyards are bountiful feeding areas. Without the...

Resource
Wild Neighbors (Adapted from the book)

Current crisis Our Animal Rescue Team has not been called in to help with any disasters at this time.

Resource

For more than a century, human beings have waged a war on coyotes, killing them with poison, traps, guns, hunting dogs and a variety of other cruel coyote killing methods. Nonetheless, the wary nature of coyotes and their remarkable adaptability has allowed them to quadruple their range throughout...

Resource
Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Together, we can learn how to peacefully coexist with wild animals and support their natural habitats.

Fight

Together, we are making the ocean safer for those who call it home.

Fight

Healthy oceans are vital to the animals who call them home and to the overall well-being of our planet. Here are a few things you can do to help. Stop trashing the ocean. You probably wouldn't dream of dumping your trash in the ocean. But did you know that over-fertilizing your lawn could have an...

Resource

The Humane Society of the United States is speaking out as the town of Westport, Connecticut, is considering changes to the current town code to allow the use of trapping to control coyotes. The proposed change would allow homeowners or the town Board of Selectman to hire wildlife trappers to trap...

Press Release

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

Resource

Glue boards (also known as glue traps) might seem like a safe solution to ridding your home of uninvited guests of the crawling, flying or scurrying sort, but they are one of the cruelest.

Resource

Citizens and conservation groups achieved another legal victory against the Hawai‘i Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) when the First Circuit Court—sitting as the Environmental Court—ruled that all unexpired recreational aquarium collection permits are void. The April 12 ruling...

Press Release
Conservation Council for Hawaii, Earthjustice, The Center for Biological Diversity

Coyotes generally avoid people. But if you encounter coyotes who have adapted to urban environments, hazing techniques can teach them to keep away.

Resource

If you see a coyote in the city or suburbs, don't be alarmed. Attacks on humans are very rare. Our tools will teach coyotes to keep their distance.

Resource

Bats, like any other mammal, can carry rabies, but the incidence of rabies in bat populations is extremely low. Most human exposures occur when someone accidentally or carelessly handles a bat or is unaware they have been bitten. The National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends...

Resource