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For more than a century, human beings have waged a war on coyotes, killing them with poison, traps, guns, hunting dogs and a variety of other cruel coyote killing methods. Nonetheless, the wary nature of coyotes and their remarkable adaptability has allowed them to quadruple their range throughout...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

These furry masked bandits probably hang out in your neighborhood—they’re amazing survivors and can thrive in all sorts of habitats.

Animal
Collage of Humane State's work

A little bit of information goes a long way when it comes to helping animals. So imagine what can happen when a lot of information gets to the right people. Take, for example, the 26 emaciated dogs rescued by sheriff’s deputy Dru Davis in Creek County, Oklahoma. Davis used a dog body scoring chart...

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Ruthanne Johnson

Humans are fascinated by the intelligent and gregarious nature of the dolphin. As one consequence of this fascination, dolphins are commercially exploited in marine parks, aquaria and "swim-with-the-dolphins" (SWTD) attractions worldwide. In the United States, the Department of Commerce's National...

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Healthy oceans are vital to the animals who call them home and to the overall well-being of our planet. Here are a few things you can do to help. Stop trashing the ocean. You probably wouldn't dream of dumping your trash in the ocean. But did you know that over-fertilizing your lawn could have an...

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Coyotes generally avoid people. But if you encounter coyotes who have adapted to urban environments, hazing techniques can teach them to keep away.

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Live animals in cages at a wet market in China

It began, almost certainly, in a bat. Then, just as SARS jumped to civets from bats, the virus that causes COVID-19 passed to another mammal, possibly a pangolin. Finally, late last year, the new coronavirus most likely jumped to humans in a wildlife market in Wuhan, China, a densely populated city...

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by Karen E. Lange

Hibernating bats have been dying in great numbers—90 to 100 percent of some colonies—from a disease known as White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), which causes a white fungus to appear on their noses, ears, wings, and tails. First discovered in 2006 near Albany, New York, WNS has spread rapidly across the...

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You can help keep wild animals where they belong—in the wild.

Fight

Together, we can learn how to peacefully coexist with wild animals and support their natural habitats.

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Together, we are making the ocean safer for those who call it home.

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Animals are forced to cross roads and highways in search of food, water, cover and mates—placing them in the path of our speeding vehicles. So what can you do? First and foremost, slow down! Keeping your speed in check gives you a better chance of stopping in time if an animal darts into the road...

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Bird flying with plastic bag in it's mouth

You don’t forget the images: the olive ridley sea turtle, a plastic straw lodged in his nose. The Rubenesque sea lion, neck cinched tight by a thick plastic packing strap. The Cuvier’s beaked whale, stomach split open to reveal more than 80 pounds of plastic waste—snack bags, rope, rice sacks...

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By Kelly L. Williams

The Humane Society of the United States was excited to announce the 2019 Prairie Dog Coalition (PDC) on the Transect. Daily content updates from the field can be found here, including the video, photo and species of the day. Learn more about the transect and the inspiration behind it.

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What are wildlife killing contests? While blood sports such as dogfighting and cockfighting have been condemned in the U.S. as barbaric and cruel, the little-known blood sport of the wildlife killing contest still happens regularly in almost all of the 45 U.S. states that have not yet banned them...

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Glue boards (also known as glue traps) might seem like a safe solution to ridding your home of uninvited guests of the crawling, flying or scurrying sort, but they are one of the cruelest.

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The public display industry keeps many species of marine mammals captive in concrete tanks, especially whales and dolphins. The Humane Society of the United States believes that these animals are best seen in their natural coastal and ocean environments instead of being held captive simply to...

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The Humane Society of the United States applauds the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for finalizing a rule prohibiting cruel hunting methods on more than 76 million acres of National Wildlife Refuge lands in Alaska. Effective 30 days from publication, state officials and trophy hunters on National...

Press Release

Though prairie dog habitat had decreased tremendously and their numbers have dwindled dramatically, people are still trying to wipe out these highly social creatures. Scapegoated for crop damage and livestock injuries, prairie dogs are used as live targets in organized shoots on public lands, miles...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors