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Both red and gray foxes live among us in cities and towns, where scavenging for food makes life easy. They generally avoid people, but the lure of easy food, such as pet food or unsecured garbage, can result in backyard visits. Usually, the best thing to do is leave foxes alone, but here's what to...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

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A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

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Every day, more and more wildlife habitat is lost to the spread of development. Give a little back by building your own humane backyard! It doesn't matter whether you have a small apartment balcony, a townhouse with a sliver of ground, a suburban yard, a sprawling corporate property or a community...

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Raccoons rarely pose health risks to humans, but as with any wild animal knowing the signs of illness and risks of exposure will help you know how to protect yourself and your family.

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If you find a wild animal in distress while you're out for a hike, traveling or even in your own backyard, get them the help they need. Find a wildlife rehabilitator in the alphabetical list below. IMPORTANT! Before you "rescue" any wild animal, make sure the animal really needs your help. Determine...

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Together, we can learn how to peacefully coexist with wild animals and support their natural habitats.

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