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Glue boards (also known as glue traps) might seem like a safe solution to ridding your home of uninvited guests of the crawling, flying or scurrying sort, but they are one of the cruelest.

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Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

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Snakes instill a deep-rooted fear in many people that few other animals can match. Even other animals seem to put them in a special category; many wild animals recognize snakes as threatening, and some birds and monkeys even have special vocalizations for sounding an alarm when a snake is seen. But...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

There are more than 200 squirrel species, but you’ve most likely only seen the most common in North America: Grey and black squirrels. Squirrels are fascinating to watch, photograph and study, and unlike most wildlife, they aren’t shy! But their adaptable nature means they’re adept at finding the...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Every day, more and more wildlife habitat is lost to the spread of development. Give a little back by building your own humane backyard! It doesn't matter whether you have a small apartment balcony, a townhouse with a sliver of ground, a suburban yard, a sprawling corporate property or a community...

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Foxes are omnivores, hunting very small animals and scavenging in cities and towns where freely available pet food and garbage can make life easier. It’s not unusual for a fox to be seen out and about during the day. Foxes are afraid of people and will usually run away when they detect your presence...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Why are there so many rabbits in my neighborhood? There are several species of wild rabbits—most are Eastern cottontail rabbits—who live across most of North America. Cottontails like to live at the edges of open areas. In fact, they are rarely found in dense forests or open grassland. This love of...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

If you find a wild animal in distress while you're out for a hike, traveling or even in your own backyard, get them the help they need. Find a wildlife rehabilitator in the alphabetical list below. IMPORTANT! Before you "rescue" any wild animal, make sure the animal really needs your help. Determine...

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