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Seeing foxes out during the day is no cause for alarm. Learn what to do if foxes are living under your porch or deck, how to keep pets safe from foxes and how to tell the difference between rabies and mange.

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors
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On a Sunday evening in June, camo-clad men chat and laugh by pickups next to a restaurant near Billings, Montana. There is a faint but unmistakable odor of decay coming from a large trash bin across the parking lot—the just-weighed bodies of 29 coyotes, some of them rotting for two days in 90-degree...

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By Karen E. Lange

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

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Coyotes generally avoid people. But if you encounter coyotes who have adapted to urban environments, hazing techniques can teach them to keep away.

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Imagine venturing so far into nature that your only surroundings are the beauty of the landscape, the sky and the wildlife living in that unspoiled habitat. Two volunteers for the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust, an affiliate of The HSUS, recently did just that, visiting protected land to observe...

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Kelly L. Williams

A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

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Meet the new neighbors—and surprise, they don’t want to eat you. As human and black bear populations expand and overlap, this native animal is under fire. But bear-friendly strategies show what can happen when we put down the guns and start cleaning up our acts. It was when Robert Scott ran into...

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Karen E. Lange

As black bear numbers increase in some North American communities and more people move into bear habitat, encounters between bears and people have risen. Whether you live in bear country or are just visiting, you can take simple steps to avoid conflicts. Why bears lose their fear of humans Bears...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors
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The woman on the phone was anxious but determined. She was calling City Wildlife, a rescue and rehabilitation center in Washington, D.C., because her dog had dug up a rabbit nest and killed three of the babies. There was one survivor. “I’m going to get some kitten formula and start feeding it...

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Kelly L. Williams
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Grizzly bears began arriving in northwestern Montana’s Blackfoot Valley in the late 1990s. Their population in surrounding mountains multiplied and gradually spread out, coming down from higher elevations into the green pastures of cattle country to search for food, returning to habitat bears had...

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By Karen E. Lange

Shy creatures who reside in extensive burrows, woodchucks keep to themselves and might go unnoticed in your own backyard.

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Together, we can learn how to peacefully coexist with wild animals and support their natural habitats.

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If you see a coyote in the city or suburbs, don't be alarmed. Attacks on humans are very rare. Our tools will teach coyotes to keep their distance.

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Leading a summer camp class about beavers, Tabby Fique hoped for a glimpse of her favorite furry hydrologists. But another wildlife sighting offered an even better teachable moment. “We were looking at the pool created by the beavers, and a muskrat swam by!” recalls Fique, the land manager for the...

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By Nancy Lawson
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As monarch butterflies and hummingbirds headed south this fall, I dreamt of following my favorite snowbirds to Mexico and Central America. But I stayed home instead, where I have a window onto the spectacular world of winter wildlife: northern flickers tossing maple leaves with their beaks in search...

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Nancy Lawson
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Decaying logs and miniature bogs, hollowed stalks and piled rocks, nutritious pollen and leaves fallen: They’re not the stuff of traditional nursery rhymes and baby showers. But if wild mothers-to-be had gift registries, these natural supplies would top the list. Though the basic elements for...

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Nancy Lawson

The woodchuck (a.k.a. groundhog) is often caught between being a celebrity and a villain—one day we rely on his shadow to forecast the seasons; the next day we grumble as he makes a meal of our carefully planted garden or digs up the yard.

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors