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Photo of a test rabbit scared in its cage.

Editor's note: Shortly after this issue went to press, Mexico banned animal testing for cosmetics. We've updated the number of countries with such bans in the copy below. When Julia Fentem began her career in toxicology around 1990, there was one government-sanctioned way of proving cosmetics safety...

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Text by Karen E. Lange  Illustrations by Rachel Stern

Update 3/27/19: Dow AgroSciences (Corteva Agriscience) has officially agreed to release the beagles to our shelter partner, Michigan Humane Society. We are so grateful to each and every one of you who spoke up and took action to save these dogs. As we celebrate their freedom, our work is far from...

Article
By M. Carrie Allan
Illustration of a mole peeking out of a burrow

While soaking her raised beds in preparation for tomato planting last summer, Gail Goldman was startled to see a tiny, waterlogged creature pop up out of the soil. Later another one briefly poked out his head. “Basically, I was watering shrews,” the Seattle gardener says of her foiled vegetable...

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By Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener
Neighbors working in a community garden
Article
By Bethany W. Adams
white rabbit with makeup illustrations

In the late 1960s, a shy teenager in Georgia read an article in her local newspaper about animals being used in laboratory testing. She was outraged. She imagined the agony these animals must have endured and was moved to write a letter to the paper. “I remember it was sort of a rebuttal to what had...

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By Michael Sharp
vole in the grass

To experience the natural world, we often navigate congested highways to swim in the sea, fly over patchworked terrain to hike through preserved forests and climb distant mountaintops to catch rare views. Largely because of our ever-increasing mobility, the areas nearest to us are rarely the dearest...

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By Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener
Gray squirrel eating in a tree

In 1749, Pennsylvania put a bounty on Eastern gray squirrels—threepence per scalp. Their crime? Eating too much corn. It wasn’t the first time humans waged war on the bushy-tailed rodents: Massachusetts had already offered fourpence. A century later, cities along the Eastern seaboard began releasing...

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BY NANCY LAWSON, AUTHOR OF THE HUMANE GARDENER
brown rabbit in the grass

Somewhere between childhood and middle age, people’s natural affinity for wildlife often melts away, overtaken by exaggerated fears of marauding armies of deer, insects and raccoons intent on invading our gardens and homes. Scorn for rabbits, the sensitive stars of many a bedtime story, is...

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By Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener
Woman applying makeup

Beauty products should do more than just help you look good—they should help you feel good, too. That comes from knowing your products and their ingredients haven’t been tested on animals. It’s never been easier to find animal-friendly products, with more than 600 cruelty-free cosmetics companies in...

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Tracy L. Scott
Monarch butterfly in flowers

The suspect creeping up near my front fence was a tough character—broad-leafed and thick-stemmed and threatening to invade my property and swallow it whole if I didn’t act fast. There was no hesitation that summer morning as I headed to work: Off with his head! It was a decision made all too easy by...

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BY NANCY LAWSON, AUTHOR OF THE HUMANE GARDENER
Coyote in Death Valley National Park

WARNING: The following story contains graphic content. In the spring of 2020, an HSUS investigator noticed something unusual: Just as some annual in-person killing contests for coyotes, foxes, bobcats and other animals were being canceled because of COVID-19, groups devoted to online killing...

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By Karen E. Lange
Beauty shot of a fox

WARNING: The following story contains graphic content. The pictures posted on social media did it: dozens or even hundreds of dead coyotes and foxes filling the backs of trucks, or laid out in rows on bloodied ground or hung by their hind legs in a celebratory display above piles of other dead...

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By Karen E. Lange
native seed packets

They were like moths to a flame or, more accurately, butterflies to a native plant. No sooner had I unloaded two joe-pye weed perennials from my car last August than three tiger swallowtails dive-bombed the pots, as if to validate my purchase. If only my fellow shoppers knew what they were missing...

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By Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener

WASHINGTON—Today, the Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International released a shocking analysis of the 2021 Dallas Safari Club annual convention, taking place virtually Feb. 10 to 14. Trophy hunters, hunting outfitters and other businesses from around the world will gather...

Press Release
Rescued chimpanzees at the waters edge eating fresh vegetables
Article
By Brianna Grant
Coyote on an urban sidewalk

Coyotes go out of their way to stay out of ours: They’re partial to open areas but seek hiding places in cities. They’re naturally active in daylight but adopt nocturnal lifestyles when living near humans. They can follow traffic signals and cross roads after rush hour. They even try to “escort” dog...

Article
By Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener
A frog jumps to safety out of a pool using a ramp to rejoin the other frogs on the safety of the grass

It seemed like a good idea at the time: Buy a house with a two-acre property, let our energetic herding dog have the run of the place and spend blissful summer days digging side by side in the dirt with her. And it was blissful, watching Mattie carve out her napping spots behind the ferns and tall...

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By Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener
woodchuck in the grass

It starts out mildly enough: Heading to work on the subway, you realize you forgot your wallet. No big deal, you think. I’ll borrow money to get home. Soon the lights go out and the train hurtles toward the sky, speeding through the atmosphere. Time passes—it’s hard to tell how long. The subway is...

Article
By Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener
Young girl playing near stream in forest

Atiya Wells was 22 when a walk in a park changed her view of the world. Growing up, she thought of natural areas as places for family cookouts, “not really seeing the forest for the trees,” she says. But on a date with her then-boyfriend-now-husband, Kieron, she ventured beyond the picnic areas of a...

Article
BY NANCY LAWSON, AUTHOR OF THE HUMANE GARDENER
a bluebird sits on a tree with a loud weed whacker in background

Sitting on her porch in the desert one afternoon while recovering from surgery, Christine Hass closed her eyes. The operation to fix her detached retina had been difficult, and she sought respite from the lingering pain. “Suddenly I could hear all the birds singing. It was March—the migrants were...

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BY NANCY LAWSON, AUTHOR OF THE HUMANE GARDENER