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This list is provided as a resource for horse owners and is for informational purposes only. Please contact specific vendors for more information on their services. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of all listings. This list is not exhaustive and is subject to change over time. The...

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The following is a list of suggestions we recommend to help keep your livestock safe during an emergency. Make a disaster plan to protect your property, your facilities and your animals. Create a list of emergency telephone numbers, including those of your employees, neighbors, veterinarian, state...

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If you're like most parents planning a weekend outing for your family, you might take your children camping, to an amusement park, or a baseball game. Not so for many parents in rural Louisiana. Or Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, Florida, and a handful of other states where feral pigs roam. A weekend...

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Danielle Ring

For more than half a century, the Humane Society of the United States and the Humane Society Legislative Fund have campaigned for the safety and preservation of wild horses and burros on our western rangelands. There is room for debate on how best to manage wild horses and burros on public lands...

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The Humane Society of the United States and the Humane Society Legislative Fund are noted champions for the protection and well-being of the nation’s wild horses and burros, and we have strong policy and practical commitments to the humane management of their herds on America’s Western ranges. We...

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Both red and gray foxes live among us in cities and towns, where scavenging for food makes life easy. They generally avoid people, but the lure of easy food, such as pet food or unsecured garbage, can result in backyard visits. Usually, the best thing to do is leave foxes alone, but here's what to...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Time and again, undercover investigations and whistleblowers have documented rampant animal cruelty and other abuses in our nation’s factory farms and slaughterhouses. But instead of working to solve those problems, Big Ag is trying to simply cover them up. Whistleblowing employees have long played...

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When mainstream America caught its first glimpse of the ugly world of hog-dog fighting, the depravity was obvious. Few among us could view without revulsion the footage of an Alabama television station showing trained attack dogs tearing into screaming, trapped pigs before an arena of cheering...

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Ariana Huemer

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

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Skunks are infamous producers of an odor so powerful that it quickly and easily communicates a clear message: “Don’t mess with me”

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Our troubled economy has a trickle-down effect onto animals. Horse owners who struggle financially often find it difficult to adequately care for their high-maintenance animals. The result is a record-high number of horses who suffer from neglect or starvation. Some are even being sent to slaughter...

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A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

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As black bear numbers increase in some North American communities and more people move into bear habitat, encounters between bears and people have risen. Whether you live in bear country or are just visiting, you can take simple steps to avoid conflicts. Why bears lose their fear of humans Bears...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Rabbit eat flowers and vegetable plants in spring and summer, and the bark of fruit and ornamental trees and shrubs in the fall and winter. Mowing and raking yards can disturb rabbit nests. Cats and other animals catch and injure small rabbits.

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Every day, more and more wildlife habitat is lost to the spread of development. Give a little back by building your own humane backyard! It doesn't matter whether you have a small apartment balcony, a townhouse with a sliver of ground, a suburban yard, a sprawling corporate property or a community...

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Sheltering in place If evacuation is not possible, a decision must be made whether to confine large animals to an available shelter on your farm or leave them out in pastures. Owners may believe that their animals are safer inside barns, but in many circumstances, confinement takes away the animals'...

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Proper feeding is a critical part of equine care.

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1. Get the facts. Learn more about soring. Read about our undercover soring investigation at a top Tennessee stable and an earlier investigation that led to federal charges against a renowned trainer. 2. Support the Prevent All Soring Tactics (PAST) Act. Contact your federal legislators and ask them...

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Contents What is the Humane Society of the United States doing to help farm animals? What are some of the biggest problems farm animals face? Aren't there laws that protect farm animals from abuse? Don't animals have to be treated well to be productive? What can I do to help farm animals?

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Most animals in our food system live in dismal conditions. Mother pigs are locked in gestation crates so small they can’t turn around. Egg-laying hens are crammed into cages so tightly they can’t even spread their wings. And chickens in the poultry industry are bred to grow so large so fast that...

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