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Glue boards (also known as glue traps) might seem like a safe solution to ridding your home of uninvited guests of the crawling, flying or scurrying sort, but they are one of the cruelest.

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

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Collage of wildlife from wildlife sanctuaries

Imagine venturing so far into nature that your only surroundings are the beauty of the landscape, the sky and the wildlife living in that unspoiled habitat. Two volunteers for the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust, an affiliate of The HSUS, recently did just that, visiting protected land to observe...

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Emily Smith

A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

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Healthy oceans are vital to the animals who call them home and to the overall well-being of our planet. Here are a few things you can do to help. Stop trashing the ocean. You probably wouldn't dream of dumping your trash in the ocean. But did you know that over-fertilizing your lawn could have an...

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Fawn sitting in the grass.

The woman on the phone was anxious but determined. She was calling City Wildlife, a rescue and rehabilitation center in Washington, D.C., because her dog had dug up a rabbit nest and killed three of the babies. There was one survivor. “I’m going to get some kitten formula and start feeding it...

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Kelly L. Williams
Shark being filmed for the movie Sharkwater Extinction

Rob Stewart was 9 the first time he came face-to-face with a shark. While he was snorkeling along a reef in the Caribbean, the shark swam into view and quickly reversed direction. The encounter lasted mere seconds, but it changed Stewart’s perception of the oft-misunderstood predator. “For me, that...

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By Emily Smith

Raccoons rarely pose health risks to humans, but as with any wild animal knowing the signs of illness and risks of exposure will help you know how to protect yourself and your family.

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These furry masked bandits probably hang out in your neighborhood—they’re amazing survivors and can thrive in all sorts of habitats.

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Once you've humanely removed a bat from inside your house or evicted them from your attic, how can you keep bats from coming back indoors? Make sure they have plenty of places to live outdoors. Bats are gaining an appreciation for their ecological contributions as pollinators, seed dispersers and...

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By Kelly L. Williams

The only mammals who can both flap their wings and fly, bats play a key role in pollinating our crops and controlling insect populations in our neighborhoods.

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On a longline fishing boat off the Galapagos Islands, a concerned biologist working undercover as a cook films a horrifying scene. As the camera rolls, a blue shark is dragged upside down out of the water, a sharp hook piercing it through the roof of the mouth and out through the side of the face...

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Michael Sharp

Sometimes a bat may go off course and accidentally find her way into a home. Stay calm, and follow these steps to remove him safely and humanely.

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An American robin eating a hawthorn berry during a snow storm.

As monarch butterflies and hummingbirds headed south this fall, I dreamt of following my favorite snowbirds to Mexico and Central America. But I stayed home instead, where I have a window onto the spectacular world of winter wildlife: northern flickers tossing maple leaves with their beaks in search...

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Nancy Lawson
Bats hanging upside down in a cage at a wildlife market in Indonesia to be sold for food

In March, as people struggled to understand how the precursor of the virus that causes COVID-19 emerged from horseshoe bats in southern China and reached humans in the central city of Wuhan, Humane Society International policy specialist Peter Li fielded one question again and again: “Why do Chinese...

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By Karen E. Lange

Together, we can learn how to peacefully coexist with wild animals and support their natural habitats.

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