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What is bear hounding? Hounding involves hunters and guides using packs of radio-collared hounds to pursue bears until the exhausted, frightened animals seek refuge in a tree (where they are shot) or turn to fight the hounds. Hounding results in injuries or death to both bears and dogs and leaves...

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Spring hunts of black bears can kill mother bears, leaving orphaned cubs to fend for themselves. Some cubs are only a few months old and still nursing or are yearlings who are still dependent for another few months. Most orphaned cubs suffer from starvation, predation or exposure. Some state...

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Representatives Steve King (R-IA) and James Sensenbrenner (R-WI) have introduced bills H.R. 4879 and H.R. 2887, which have been dubbed the States' Rights Elimination Acts. These bills could completely undermine the authority of states to pass laws to protect animals and their citizens. A diverse and...

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Sammi explores the natural areas in his outdoor enclosure.

Imagine venturing so far into nature that your only surroundings are the beauty of the landscape, the sky and the wildlife living in that unspoiled habitat. Two volunteers for the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust, an affiliate of The HSUS, recently did just that, visiting protected land to observe...

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Kelly L. Williams

A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

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Black bear walking down the street in Yellowstone

Meet the new neighbors—and surprise, they don’t want to eat you. As human and black bear populations expand and overlap, this native animal is under fire. But bear-friendly strategies show what can happen when we put down the guns and start cleaning up our acts. It was when Robert Scott ran into...

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Karen E. Lange

As black bear numbers increase in some North American communities and more people move into bear habitat, encounters between bears and people have risen. Whether you live in bear country or are just visiting, you can take simple steps to avoid conflicts. Why bears lose their fear of humans Bears...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors
Bear and her cubs in the wild

Grizzly bears began arriving in northwestern Montana’s Blackfoot Valley in the late 1990s. Their population in surrounding mountains multiplied and gradually spread out, coming down from higher elevations into the green pastures of cattle country to search for food, returning to habitat bears had...

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By Karen E. Lange

Shy creatures who reside in extensive burrows, woodchucks keep to themselves and might go unnoticed in your own backyard.

Animal

We're standing against the most egregious abuses of wildlife.

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Together, we can learn how to peacefully coexist with wild animals and support their natural habitats.

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What is Internet hunting? Internet hunting—also called remote controlled hunting—utilizes Internet technology to allow a computer user to hunt large game and exotic animals from their own home. The controversial practice originated in San Antonio, Texas, with the launching of the website Live-Shot...

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The Humane Society of the United States applauds the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for finalizing a rule prohibiting cruel hunting methods on more than 76 million acres of National Wildlife Refuge lands in Alaska. Effective 30 days from publication, state officials and trophy hunters on National...

Press Release

The woodchuck (a.k.a. groundhog) is often caught between being a celebrity and a villain—one day we rely on his shadow to forecast the seasons; the next day we grumble as he makes a meal of our carefully planted garden or digs up the yard.

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors