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House mice, like all animals, like to stay warm and fed, and often spend their lives comfortably inside buildings without causing any problems. If they must go however, these humane tips will help you find them a new home.

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Glue boards (also known as glue traps) might seem like a safe solution to ridding your home of uninvited guests of the crawling, flying or scurrying sort, but they are one of the cruelest.

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Rats are incredibly hardy animals who have never shown any problem adjusting to change. Usually that change is the introduction of a new poison, as humans constantly work harder and harder to exterminate these animals.

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors
White tiger in a cage at a traveling circus

The white Bengal tiger paces back and forth, back and forth in a squat cage on the edge of the show ring. The cage is little longer than the tiger's body. The clock ticks down to the start of three scheduled performances at this fair in Pennsylvania. Potted palms and wooden masks decorate the ring...

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by Karen E. Lange

A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

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Bear and her cubs in the wild

Grizzly bears began arriving in northwestern Montana’s Blackfoot Valley in the late 1990s. Their population in surrounding mountains multiplied and gradually spread out, coming down from higher elevations into the green pastures of cattle country to search for food, returning to habitat bears had...

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By Karen E. Lange

Shy creatures who reside in extensive burrows, woodchucks keep to themselves and might go unnoticed in your own backyard.

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The woodchuck (a.k.a. groundhog) is often caught between being a celebrity and a villain—one day we rely on his shadow to forecast the seasons; the next day we grumble as he makes a meal of our carefully planted garden or digs up the yard.

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors