Showing 8 of 8 results

Contents What is the Humane Society of the United States doing to address the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis? What is being done at the state level? Should I have a preparedness plan for my pet(s)? Can my pet get COVID-19? How can I keep my home clean AND safe for my pets? What can I do to help...

Resource

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

Resource

If a coyote is in your neighborhood If you spot a coyote in your neighborhood, relax: Most coyotes avoid people. “Seeing a coyote out during the day is not a cause for alarm, especially in the spring and summer when they’re looking for food for their pups,” says Lynsey White, HSUS director of humane...

Resource

Coyotes generally avoid people. But if you encounter coyotes who have adapted to urban environments, hazing techniques can teach them to keep away.

Resource

Coyotes generally avoid humans, even when their home range encompasses largely urban or suburban habitat. However, the presence of a free buffet in the form of pet food or garbage can lure coyotes into suburban yards and create the impression that backyards are bountiful feeding areas. Without the...

Resource
Wild Neighbors (Adapted from the book)

In response to the coronavirus crisis, the Humane Society of the United States established the COVID-19 Relief Fund to help keep pets with their people. Contributions to the fund are being used to provide veterinary care, pet food, horse feed and animal care supplies, as well as other costs related...

Resource

If you see a coyote in the city or suburbs, don't be alarmed. Attacks on humans are very rare. Our tools will teach coyotes to keep their distance.

Resource

Together, we can learn how to peacefully coexist with wild animals and support their natural habitats.

Fight