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Together, we are making the ocean safer for those who call it home.

Fight

The only mammals who can both flap their wings and fly, bats play a key role in pollinating our crops and controlling insect populations in our neighborhoods.

Animal

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

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There are more than 200 squirrel species, but you’ve most likely only seen the most common in North America: Grey and black squirrels. Squirrels are fascinating to watch, photograph and study, and unlike most wildlife, they aren’t shy! But their adaptable nature means they’re adept at finding the...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

As black bear numbers increase in some North American communities and more people move into bear habitat, encounters between bears and people have risen. Whether you live in bear country or are just visiting, you can take simple steps to avoid conflicts. Why bears lose their fear of humans Bears...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

1. Because you'll help a pet in need. Each year, millions of pets enter shelters and rescues in the United States, many surrendered by loving families who can’t access pet-friendly housing or veterinary care, while others find their way as victims of cruelty. While the number of animals who are...

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Healthy oceans are vital to the animals who call them home and to the overall well-being of our planet. Here are a few things you can do to help. Stop trashing the ocean You probably wouldn't dream of dumping your trash in the ocean. But did you know that over-fertilizing your lawn could have an...

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