Showing 20 of 24 results

Pet food and other necessities To locate a pet food pantry or other pet-related community service, explore an interactive resource map provided by Feeding Pets of the Homeless; just choose which resource you’re seeking under the “Get Help” listing on the right. Or contact your local shelter and...

Resource

House mice, like all animals, like to stay warm and fed, and often spend their lives comfortably inside buildings without causing any problems. If they must go however, these humane tips will help you find them a new home.

Resource
Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

There are more than 40 bat species in the U.S. and Canada, but only a few kinds of bats ever cause problems for people. No, bats won't suck your blood or get tangled in your hair—but they may take up residence in your attic to raise their young. Bats in houses can go unnoticed for years...

Resource
Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

For more than half a century, the Humane Society of the United States and the Humane Society Legislative Fund have campaigned for the safety and preservation of wild horses and burros on our western rangelands. There is room for debate on how best to manage wild horses and burros on public lands...

Resource

The Humane Society of the United States and the Humane Society Legislative Fund are noted champions for the protection and well-being of the nation’s wild horses and burros, and we have strong policy and practical commitments to the humane management of their herds on America’s Western ranges. We...

Resource

Rats are incredibly hardy animals who have never shown any problem adjusting to change. Usually that change is the introduction of a new poison or new ways of trapping rats, as humans constantly work harder and harder to exterminate these animals.

Resource
Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Glue boards (also known as glue traps) might seem like a safe solution to ridding your home of uninvited guests of the crawling, flying or scurrying sort, but they are one of the cruelest.

Resource

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

Resource

For more than a century, human beings have waged a war on coyotes, killing them with poison, traps, guns, hunting dogs and a variety of other cruel coyote killing methods. Nonetheless, the wary nature of coyotes and their remarkable adaptability has allowed them to quadruple their range throughout...

Resource
Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

1. Because you'll save a life. Each year, it's estimated that more than one million adoptable dogs and cats are euthanized in the United States, simply because too many pets come into shelters and too few people consider adoption when looking for a pet. The number of euthanized animals could be...

Resource

Every day, more and more wildlife habitat is lost to the spread of development. Give a little back by building your own humane backyard! It doesn't matter whether you have a small apartment balcony, a townhouse with a sliver of ground, a suburban yard, a sprawling corporate property or a community...

Resource

Foxes are omnivores, hunting very small animals and scavenging in cities and towns where freely available pet food and garbage can make life easier. It’s not unusual for a fox to be seen out and about during the day. Foxes are afraid of people and will usually run away when they detect your presence...

Resource
Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Once you've humanely removed a bat from inside your house or evicted them from your attic, how can you keep bats from coming back indoors? Make sure they have plenty of places to live outdoors. Bats are gaining an appreciation for their ecological contributions as pollinators, seed dispersers and...

Resource

If a coyote is in your neighborhood If you spot a coyote in your neighborhood, relax: Most coyotes avoid people. “Seeing a coyote out during the day is not a cause for alarm, especially in the spring and summer when they’re looking for food for their pups,” says Lynsey White, HSUS director of humane...

Resource

Raccoons rarely pose health risks to humans, but as with any wild animal knowing the signs of illness and risks of exposure will help you know how to protect yourself and your family.

Resource

Contents How does the HSUS help local animal shelters and rescue groups? What if I have a concern about my local shelter or rescue? Where can I adopt a pet? How can I volunteer to help animals? I need to find a new home for my pet. Where can I turn? What is the HSUS's position on use of the gas...

Resource

A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

Resource

Coyotes generally avoid people. But if you encounter coyotes who have adapted to urban environments, hazing techniques can teach them to keep away.

Resource

Why are there so many rabbits in my neighborhood? There are several species of wild rabbits—most are Eastern cottontail rabbits—who live across most of North America. Cottontails like to live at the edges of open areas. In fact, they are rarely found in dense forests or open grassland. This love of...

Resource
Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Coyotes generally avoid humans, even when their home range encompasses largely urban or suburban habitat. However, the presence of a free buffet in the form of pet food or garbage can lure coyotes into suburban yards and create the impression that backyards are bountiful feeding areas. Without the...

Resource
Wild Neighbors (Adapted from the book)