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April 10, 2013

Kind News Feature: Saving Mustangs

What has inspired kids across the country to speak out for wild horses and burros?

Kind News, April/May 2013

  • These mustangs live at Duchess Sanctuary with other rescued horses. Jennifer Kunz/The HSUS

Wild horses, called mustangs, are found in ten western states. Each year, hundreds of the horses are rounded up by United States government agencies. The horses are put in holding pens where, for a small fee, anyone can adopt them.

The lucky ones will be adopted by people who will love and care for them. But sadly, many of the horses will be purchased by people who trade or sell them at auctions. Some will be sent to Canada or Mexico to be slaughtered (killed for their meat). It’s this practice that has young people like Declan Gregg and Robin Warren speaking out for horses.

"I started my organization, Children 4 Horses, to … inspire other kids, as well as adults, to fight for humane treatment of horses and to end horse slaughter for good," says Declan.

Robin Warren agrees. "We need to stop selling our wild horses and start protecting them!" she says.

Join Declan and Robin in their quest to save horses »

  • Saved from slaughter, Brownie and Jewel now live with other wild horses at a South Dakota sanctuary. Jennifer Kunz/The HSUS

Safe at last

Meet Brownie and Jewel. Caught in a roundup, these two mustangs were traded and sold—moved between auction yards and feedlots. Just hours before they were to be sent to a Canadian slaughterhouse, these lucky horses were rescued. They were hungry, exhausted, and badly in need of veterinary care—but they were safe.

Like the other mustangs on this page, they found a safe haven at Duchess Sanctuary, operated by HSUS affiliate, The Fund for Animals. There, with rest and veterinary care, they slowly recovered. Brownie and Jewel now share a 13,000 acre sanctuary in South Dakota with other mustangs. They’re once again wild and free.

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