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Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

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Glue boards (also known as glue traps) might seem like a safe solution to ridding your home of uninvited guests of the crawling, flying or scurrying sort, but they are one of the cruelest.

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Alternative testing methods have many advantages over traditional animal tests—including being more humane—but implementing an alternative from idea to acceptance can take years. Learn more about the step-by-step process, then check out our list of examples in action. Step 1: Defining The word...

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Bats, like any other mammal, can carry rabies, but the incidence of rabies in bat populations is extremely low. Most human exposures occur when someone accidentally or carelessly handles a bat or is unaware they have been bitten. The National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends...

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Sometimes a bat may go off course and accidentally find her way into a home. Stay calm, and follow these steps to remove him safely and humanely.

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With the right information and supplies, you may be able to solve some conflicts with wildlife by yourself. But when it’s time to call in a professional, here's how to find a humane, effective and ethical company. Ask for an inspection and written estimate It will be difficult for any company to...

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Once you've humanely removed a bat from inside your house or evicted them from your attic, how can you keep bats from coming back indoors? Make sure they have plenty of places to live outdoors. Bats are gaining an appreciation for their ecological contributions as pollinators, seed dispersers and...

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If you find a wild animal in distress, scroll down to your state in the alphabetical list below to learn how to find a wildlife rehabilitator in your area. IMPORTANT! Before you "rescue" any wild animal, make sure the animal really needs your help. Determine if the animal is truly orphaned or...

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Conflicts between humans and wildlife are increasing as human populations and urbanization continue to expand globally. A number of additional factors increase the likelihood of human-wildlife interactions and those include wild animals adapting to and flourishing in urban areas, rural areas...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Hibernating bats have been dying in great numbers—90 to 100 percent of some colonies—from a disease known as White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), which causes a white fungus to appear on their noses, ears, wings, and tails. First discovered in 2006 near Albany, New York, WNS has spread rapidly across the...

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