Showing 20 of 21 results
Green snake in grass

They slip soundlessly through our landscapes, cloaked in a rainbow of colors and patterns that help them become one with bark, rocks, leaves and soil. Often the only sign of their existence is what they leave behind: ghostly shed skins imprinted with shapes of eyes and scales, traces of pigmentation...

Article
By Nancy Lawson

House mice, like all animals, like to stay warm and fed, and often spend their lives comfortably inside buildings without causing any problems. If they must go however, these humane tips will help you find them a new home.

Resource
Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Pet food and other necessities To locate a pet food pantry or other pet-related community service, explore an interactive resource map provided by Feeding Pets of the Homeless; just choose which resource you’re seeking under the “Get Help” listing on the right. Or contact your local shelter and...

Resource

Rats are incredibly hardy animals who have never shown any problem adjusting to change. Usually that change is the introduction of a new poison, as humans constantly work harder and harder to exterminate these animals.

Resource
Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Glue boards (also known as glue traps) might seem like a safe solution to ridding your home of uninvited guests of the crawling, flying or scurrying sort, but they are one of the cruelest.

Resource

Snakes instill a deep-rooted fear in many people that few other animals can match. Even other animals seem to put them in a special category; many wild animals recognize snakes as threatening, and some birds and monkeys even have special vocalizations for sounding an alarm when a snake is seen. But...

Resource
Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors
Resource
Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Skunks are infamous producers of an odor so powerful that it quickly and easily communicates a clear message: “Don’t mess with me”

Resource
Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

Resource
Collage of wildlife from wildlife sanctuaries

Imagine venturing so far into nature that your only surroundings are the beauty of the landscape, the sky and the wildlife living in that unspoiled habitat. Two volunteers for the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust, an affiliate of The HSUS, recently did just that, visiting protected land to observe...

Article
Emily Smith

A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

Resource

1. Because you'll save a life. Each year, it's estimated that more than one million adoptable dogs and cats are euthanized in the United States, simply because too many pets come into shelters and too few people consider adoption when looking for a pet. The number of euthanized animals could be...

Resource

Once you've humanely removed a bat from inside your house or evicted them from your attic, how can you keep bats from coming back indoors? Make sure they have plenty of places to live outdoors. Bats are gaining an appreciation for their ecological contributions as pollinators, seed dispersers and...

Resource

The only mammals who can both flap their wings and fly, bats play a key role in pollinating our crops and controlling insect populations in our neighborhoods.

Animal

Solitary creatures who prefer to be left alone, snakes have a bad reputation that doesn’t match their behavior.

Animal

Sometimes a bat may go off course and accidentally find her way into a home. Stay calm, and follow these steps to remove him safely and humanely.

Resource

Misunderstood skunks are gentle, near-sighted animals with one infamous—and pungent—defense mechanism.

Animal
An American robin eating a hawthorn berry during a snow storm.

As monarch butterflies and hummingbirds headed south this fall, I dreamt of following my favorite snowbirds to Mexico and Central America. But I stayed home instead, where I have a window onto the spectacular world of winter wildlife: northern flickers tossing maple leaves with their beaks in search...

Article
Nancy Lawson