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Over the decades, humans have come up with a variety of terms for domestic cats. We refer to pet cats, feral cats, wild cats, alley cats, stray cats, barn cats and, more recently, community cats. They’re all the same species ( Felis catus); the terms we use simply describe their lifestyle, ownership...

Cats bring joy and companionship to millions of people. Here's how you can take care of them.

Although community cats are resourceful and instinctively seek out safe places in times of danger, extreme weather may pose a threat to them. If you take care of a colony of cats, there are many things you can do to increase their chances of coming through the storm safe and sound. What to do right...

Shelter, food, and water are especially important to outdoor cats--feral and stray--in the cold of winter. Follow our advice on building the best kind of shelter and keeping food and water from freezing. Also, to TNR or not to TNR? We'll answer that question.

Government officials and lawmakers: Use policy to change the lives of community cats Have you been hearing from citizens who don’t want cats on their property? Are you looking for a way to modify ordinances so that Trap-Neuter-Return ( TNR) programs are allowed? You're not alone. More and more...

Contents What is an outdoor cat? What is TNR? Where can I get help sterilizing the cats I feed? How can I tell if a cat I see outside is lost or needs my help? I’ve found a litter of kittens: Should I rescue them? Why do some people consider outdoor cats a nuisance? How can I keep cats out of my...

Whether you’re a large shelter, a private nonprofit, a municipal agency or a small all-volunteer rescue, there are ways to help your area’s community cats. Community cats produce around 80% of the kittens born in the U.S. each year. It’s only by caring for and managing community cats that we can...

If you’ve encountered a cat outdoors, or an unfamiliar cat has started hanging out in your backyard, you’ve likely wondered if the cat needs your help. The answer is maybe. The cat may be: an owned pet who lives nearby and is allowed to roam outside. a lost cat whose owners are searching for their...

Loree O’Hagan’s new home in Great Cacapon, West Virginia, came with four bedrooms, a wrap-around deck, a view of the mountains—and a family of feral cats. That last detail wasn’t mentioned in the seller’s disclosure report, but O’Hagan and her husband got an inkling on moving day, when they spotted...

So your indoor cat wants to go outdoors—but you know that keeping cats inside is better for their safety and the safety of wild animals. What’s a caring cat guardian to do? Enter catios, or cat patios. These screened porches designed for cats provide enrichment and a (safe) way to spend time in...

Wherever you live or work, chances are that there are community cats living nearby. You may see them hanging outside a neighbor’s home, lurking around the dumpsters behind a local restaurant or grocery store, or loitering around a commercial lot. An estimated 10-12% of the American public feed...

With a mission to protect all animals, the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) stands on common ground with those who care about both cats and wildlife. With determination, innovation and collaboration, we can implement and sustain effective programs to humanely resolve human-cat-wildlife...

The Humane Society of the United States is not a shelter, parent organization or regulatory/investigative agency for local humane societies, animal shelters, animal care and control agencies or rescue groups. These groups are independent organizations governed by their own boards of directors or by...

If you spot a coyote in your neighborhood, relax: Most coyotes avoid people. “Seeing a coyote out during the day is not a cause for alarm, especially in the spring and summer when they’re out looking for food for their pups,” says Lynsey White, HSUS director of humane wildlife conflict resolution...

Contents Plan for your pets Make a disaster kit for pets If you evacuate, take your pet If you stay home, do it safely Pets and wildfires After the emergency Additional resources for equines, livestock and community cats

Extreme weather events like wildfires can kill wild animals, either from the fire itself, through smoke inhalation or through loss of habitat. Animals who are very young, old or otherwise unable to move away quickly are particularly vulnerable. Wild animals cope with wildfires in a variety of ways...

Plan for your livestock Write down a list of emergency telephone numbers, including those of your employees, neighbors, veterinarian, state veterinarian, poison control, local animal shelter, animal care and control, county extension service, local agricultural schools, trailering resources and...

Contents Plan for your equines Evacuating without your equines Equines and floodwater Equines and barn fires

Studies show that pets can ease anxiety, depression and loneliness, particularly in older adults and veterans who live alone. You can help pets and people in your community in so many ways.