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With their distinctive honks and propensity to graze on roadside grass, Canada geese are among the most ubiquitous of our wild neighbors.

Animal

Some ways to scare geese away work better than others. All work better where the landscaping makes geese wary and much better where you have also addled or used contraception so geese are not tending flightless goslings. Until their young can fly at the end of summer, these aversive conditioning...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

In some communities, Canada geese are rounded up and killed because people find them to be a nuisance, particularly when goose droppings accumulate. This is wrong. It is not ethical to kill wild birds merely because their mess bothers us or we find them a nuisance and it’s not necessary to kill...

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The most lasting way to avoid Canada geese problems (and often the most cost-effective in the long run) is to change the habitat so it doesn't appeal to them. You can do this by taking away their preferred foods and creating a landscape where the birds don't feel safe. Habitat changes will work...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Once decimated by hunting and habitat loss, Canada geese rebounded after captive birds were released throughout the country. People may be surprised to hear that birds learn to migrate from their parents and flock—they don't hatch with this complex knowledge. So released geese never learned to fly...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Wherever there are Canada geese, there are goose droppings. And therein lies the main problem that many people have with these otherwise mostly harmless birds. Rounding up and killing entire flocks of geese has become an all-too-common (and temporary) fix in many communities. Besides being inhumane...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

There is no single quick fix that will resolve human-goose conflicts at every site. But well-designed programs can make a major difference. It isn't possible (or even desirable) to eliminate geese from a community. The goal is to reduce conflicts to an acceptable level. So, solutions need to address...

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The humane way to limit flock growth and stabilize goose populations is to keep eggs from hatching, in a process known as “addling.” It can be done by treating eggs with corn oil or by removing the eggs from the nest, which is humane if done at the earliest stages of development. Why addling? It...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)
Fire flies in summer in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

You’re out for a walk in the woods. You turn a bend in the trail, and there stands a majestic deer. Or maybe there’s a bobcat, disappearing into the thicket. When it comes to these unexpected animal sightings, even the briefest moments are awe-inspiring. That’s why wildlife-watching vacations are so...

Article
Ruthanne Johnson
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Ducks are social birds who live in waterways such as ponds and streams, with a maximum lifespan of about 20 years.

Animal

From the soaring eagles we watch from afar to the pet parakeets and canaries chirping in our homes ...

Animal

The following resources are available for land owners and land trusts participating in the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust's Humane Stewardship Alliance. Contents Resources for participating alliance members Template wildlife conflict management plans Species-specific wildlife conflict resolution...

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Living with Wild Neighbors in Urban and Suburban Communities: A Guide for Local Leaders is designed to help communities find long-lasting, nonlethal solutions to conflicts with Canada geese, deer, coyotes, beavers, and other urban wildlife. The guide examines how typical conflicts over wildlife...

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As Kim Porter makes the morning rounds on her northeastern Massachusetts farm—checking in on the geese, horses and ponies—the special greeting from her burro, Nacho, entices the biggest grin, his squeaky little “hees” without the “haws.” “He stands in the back of his stall,” Porter says, “and when...

Article
Ruthanne Johnson
Beauty shot of a mountain lion

Depending on where you live, your wild neighbors are probably on the small side: squirrels, geese, songbirds, maybe the occasional deer. In some parts of the United States, though, we’re lucky enough to share our land with North America’s native carnivores. Wolves, black bears and mountain lions...

Article
By Kelly L. Williams

Today, the Humane Society of the United States assisted the Prince George’s County Animal Services Division in seizing more than 125 animals from an alleged large-scale cruelty situation in Prince George’s County, Maryland. The species found on the property include geese, chickens, peafowl, pigs...

Press Release