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Around the world, tree squirrels are among the most prolific—and fun to watch—backyard wildlife species.

Animal

Sometimes squirrels enter chimneys and are unable to climb back out, forcing them to try to get out from a fireplace or basement ducts. Assume that the squirrel you hear scrambling in a chimney is trapped, unless you’ve got clear evidence that they are able to climb back out on their own. Never try...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Squirrels living in attics are a concern because they may gnaw on boards and electrical wires. Usually, the most serious problems come from nesting adult females. They often build their nests near openings, such as an unscreened vent or loose or rotten trim boards. The first sign of a squirrel in...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Countless backyards are battlegrounds between determined homeowners and squirrels fighting over bird food. No mammal is as competent at achieving their goal—ready to defy every design, every device and every technology intended to keep them from consuming sunflower seeds, peanuts and corn. Some...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Squirrels may nibble on some flowers and trees, dig holes in lawns and even chew on wooden decks and furniture. Before you blame the squirrels though, make sure the damage isn't caused by another animal. Squirrels are only active during the day, so you should be able to catch them in the act...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Sometimes they get in through an open door or window. Others may come down the chimney and through the fireplace. However they got there, a squirrel who has entered a house is there by accident and will be desperate to get out. Show that squirrel the door Place your pets in another room. Close all...

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Tree squirrels are cute, fuzzy and fun to watch, but humans have something of a love/hate relationship with them. We love their crazy antics—but we hate when they're raiding our birdfeeders. If you've got squirrels driving you nutty, remember that they're only doing what's natural: Looking for a...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

It's common to see baby wild animals outside during spring, as a new generation makes its way into the world. Baby wild animals might seem like they need our help, but unless the animal is truly orphaned or injured, there is no need to rescue them. These tips can help you decide whether to take...

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Fawn sitting in the grass.

The woman on the phone was anxious but determined. She was calling City Wildlife, a rescue and rehabilitation center in Washington, D.C., because her dog had dug up a rabbit nest and killed three of the babies. There was one survivor. “I’m going to get some kitten formula and start feeding it...

Article
Kelly L. Williams
An American robin eating a hawthorn berry during a snow storm.

As monarch butterflies and hummingbirds headed south this fall, I dreamt of following my favorite snowbirds to Mexico and Central America. But I stayed home instead, where I have a window onto the spectacular world of winter wildlife: northern flickers tossing maple leaves with their beaks in search...

Article
Nancy Lawson

A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

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Have you taken a good look at your house lately? Do you know if you have deteriorated trim and fascia boards, holes in attic vents or an open chimney? While you may not be keeping close tabs on the condition of your house, you can bet the critters in your neighborhood are. It's recommended to assess...

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Together, we can learn how to peacefully coexist with wild animals and support their natural habitats.

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HSUS Animal Rescue Team rescuing a cat following Hurricane Harvey

When a railroad track bed blocked their path, the two HSUS rescuers and the head of Beaumont’s animal shelter got out of their boat and waded a mile in the brown water pouring through the neighborhood. They pushed toward a house where the owner had reported a Chihuahua and kitten still inside...

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Karen Lange
Illustrtion of a woman lying on a blanket in the grass reading books.

It’s not easy to write a book roundup for All Animals. As the magazine’s name implies, we don’t discriminate. A book that celebrates butterflies and birds but maligns squirrels and snakes will never make the cut. That narrows the field considerably but still leaves treasures for summer reading. From...

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By Nancy Lawson

One quick and easy solution to keep raccoons from eating seed intended for your backyard birds is to put out only as much seed as the birds will eat by nightfall. Raccoons forage at night, so they’ll miss the free lunch you’re providing. Another equally simple solution is to bring your bird feeders...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Thanks to widespread pet vaccinations, effective post-exposure treatment and the relative rarity of undetected bites by rabid animals, the number of human deaths from rabies in the United States caused has declined to an average of only one or two per year—far less than the number of human...

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They walk dogs and contact their legislators. They clean cages and call constituents and monitor our wildlife land trust properties. They enter data collected during busy vet clinics and they collect signatures that will help get new laws on the books. Their tasks and time commitments are different...

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Kelly L. Williams

In a number of states, we hear a rallying cry for deer hunts to be implemented to reduce the devastating effects of Lyme disease. However, what is lesser known is that hunting deer will not protect people from Lyme disease –and what was once considered the “deer tick” is now known to be the “black...

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The Humane Society of the United States
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