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Around the world, tree squirrels are among the most prolific—and fun to watch—backyard wildlife species.

Animal

Sometimes squirrels enter chimneys and are unable to climb back out, forcing them to try to get out from a fireplace or basement ducts. Assume that the squirrel you hear scrambling in a chimney is trapped, unless you’ve got clear evidence that they are able to climb back out on their own. Never try...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Squirrels living in attics are a concern because they may gnaw on boards and electrical wires. Usually, the most serious problems come from nesting adult females. They often build their nests near openings, such as an unscreened vent or loose or rotten trim boards. The first sign of a squirrel in...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)
Gray squirrel eating in a tree

In 1749, Pennsylvania put a bounty on Eastern gray squirrels—threepence per scalp. Their crime? Eating too much corn. It wasn’t the first time humans waged war on the bushy-tailed rodents: Massachusetts had already offered fourpence. A century later, cities along the Eastern seaboard began releasing...

Article
BY NANCY LAWSON, AUTHOR OF THE HUMANE GARDENER

Countless backyards are battlegrounds between determined homeowners and squirrels fighting over bird food. No mammal is as competent at achieving their goal—ready to defy every design, every device and every technology intended to keep them from consuming sunflower seeds, peanuts and corn. Some...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Sometimes they get in through an open door or window. Others may come down the chimney and through the fireplace. However they got there, a squirrel who has entered a house is there by accident and will be desperate to get out. Show that squirrel the door Place your pets in another room. Close all...

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Tree squirrels are cute, fuzzy and fun to watch, but humans have something of a love/hate relationship with them. We love their crazy antics—but we hate when they're raiding our birdfeeders. If you've got squirrels driving you nutty, remember that they're only doing what's natural: Looking for a...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

Squirrels may nibble on some flowers and trees, dig holes in lawns and even chew on wooden decks and furniture. Before you blame the squirrels though, make sure the damage isn't caused by another animal. Squirrels are only active during the day, so you should be able to catch them in the act...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)

It's common to see baby wild animals outside during spring, as a new generation makes its way into the world. Baby wild animals might seem like they need our help, but unless the animal is truly orphaned or injured, there is no need to rescue them. These tips can help you decide whether to take...

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Photo of deer roaming freely on Fripp Island, SC.

It all began with a deer on the cover of All Animals magazine. Terry Kline, administrator of the Botstiber Foundation outside Philadelphia, saw the photo in the spring of 2014 and turned to a feature about managing deer populations with fertility control (“Out of season,” May/June 2014). For years...

Article
By Karen E. Lange

The Humane Society of the United States is calling on the Germantown Sportsman’s Club in Columbia County, New York, to cancel their upcoming Squirrel Scramble, a competition to kill the heaviest squirrels for prizes. The event is scheduled for Feb. 27. “New York’s cruel killing contests are...

Press Release
Fawn sitting in the grass.

The woman on the phone was anxious but determined. She was calling City Wildlife, a rescue and rehabilitation center in Washington, D.C., because her dog had dug up a rabbit nest and killed three of the babies. There was one survivor. “I’m going to get some kitten formula and start feeding it...

Article
Kelly L. Williams
An American robin eating a hawthorn berry during a snow storm.

As monarch butterflies and hummingbirds headed south this fall, I dreamt of following my favorite snowbirds to Mexico and Central America. But I stayed home instead, where I have a window onto the spectacular world of winter wildlife: northern flickers tossing maple leaves with their beaks in search...

Article
BY NANCY LAWSON, AUTHOR OF THE HUMANE GARDENER
woodchuck in the grass

It starts out mildly enough: Heading to work on the subway, you realize you forgot your wallet. No big deal, you think. I’ll borrow money to get home. Soon the lights go out and the train hurtles toward the sky, speeding through the atmosphere. Time passes—it’s hard to tell how long. The subway is...

Article
By Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener

A raccoon in the chimney, a woodchuck under the shed, a skunk under the back porch … When confronted with wildlife living up-close in their own homes or backyards, well-meaning but harried homeowners often resort to what they see as the most humane solution—live-trapping the animal and then setting...

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Have you taken a good look at your house lately? Do you know if you have deteriorated trim and fascia boards, holes in attic vents or an open chimney? While you may not be keeping close tabs on the condition of your house, you can bet the critters in your neighborhood are. It's recommended to assess...

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Together, we can learn how to peacefully coexist with wild animals and support their natural habitats.

Fight
HSUS Animal Rescue Team rescuing a cat following Hurricane Harvey

When a railroad track bed blocked their path, the two HSUS rescuers and the head of Beaumont’s animal shelter got out of their boat and waded a mile in the brown water pouring through the neighborhood. They pushed toward a house where the owner had reported a Chihuahua and kitten still inside...

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Karen Lange