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What is the Humane Society of the United States’ Animal Rescue and Response team? How/when does the team get called in to help? What sort of situations are you typically called in for? If you hear about a situation where animals need help, can you just go? Can I call you if I know of animals who...

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Emergency response team on a boat with rescued cats in a crate.

Long before emergency alerts ring out, members of the Humane Society of the United States' Animal Rescue and Response team are ready to respond at a moment’s notice. Armed with specialized training and cutting-edge equipment, these elite professionals answer the call for help wherever animals are in...

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By Emily Hamlin Smith

About our volunteers Animal rescue volunteers work with the Animal Rescue and Response team to help save animals who are the victims of illegal animal cruelty and natural disasters. Whether an out of control hoarder or dogfighting operation, or hurricane or puppy mill, animal rescue volunteers...

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Why livestock owners need to be prepared Disaster preparedness is important for all animals, but it is especially important for livestock because of the size of the animals and their shelter and transportation needs. Disasters can happen anywhere and take many different forms—from hurricanes to barn...

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A good disaster plan is vital to keeping yourself and your animal companions safe. But horses require extra consideration because of their size and specific transportation needs. Since you won’t have much time to think or act during an emergency, take time now to create an effective emergency plan...

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Are you a law enforcement officer or animal control officer who needs assistance with an animal cruelty case? Are you concerned about an animal cruelty or neglect situation involving, but not limited to, animal fighting, puppy mills, hoarding, livestock abuse or general cruelty concerns? Are you an...

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Take extra precautions to be sure you and your loved ones—pets included—can evacuate safely during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Where can I receive up-to-date information on a storm in my area? What should I do to prepare for a hurricane? What should I do to prepare for flooding in my area? What can the HSUS do to help? My shelter can take animals. How can we help? I need help evacuating pets from my residence/shelter. Where...

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HSUS Animal Rescue Team rescuing a cat following Hurricane Harvey

When a railroad track bed blocked their path, the two HSUS rescuers and the head of Beaumont’s animal shelter got out of their boat and waded a mile in the brown water pouring through the neighborhood. They pushed toward a house where the owner had reported a Chihuahua and kitten still inside...

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Karen Lange

What should I do to keep my pets safe during disasters? What can the HSUS do to help? Where do the animals go when you transport them out of these communities? Do you transport missing pets out of the disaster impact region? How can I support the HSUS’s work to help animals impacted by the tornadoes...

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The following statements of policy have been prepared by the professional staff of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and were approved by its Board of Directors on October 22, 2005. These statements express the values and positions of the HSUS on a wide range of issues involving human...

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woman wearing mask petting a dog

In a year already disrupted by a global pandemic, this fall’s raging wildfires and active hurricane season meant our Animal Rescue and Response team had to be flexible, carefully evaluating each disaster and adapting their response for the greatest impact. After years of disaster response, we’ve...

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By Brianna Grant
Illustration of a dog with leash in his mouth, cat on a carrier, and luggage in front of a stormy window.

It’s 2 in the morning and you awake to an unfamiliar buzz from your phone. It’s an emergency alert—there’s flash flooding in your area and you need to evacuate, now. Your kid is asleep down the hall. Your cat’s under the bed in her favorite nighttime hiding spot. Your dog is blinking at you from the...

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By Kelly L. Williams

Barn fires are one of any horse owner’s biggest nightmares. In just a few minutes of heat, smoke and fury, thousands of dollars of saddles, bridles, hay, grain and equipment can be lost along with the barn. That your horse could be trapped inside is almost too painful to imagine. Preventing barn...

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Our troubled economy has a trickle-down effect onto animals. Horse owners who struggle financially often find it difficult to adequately care for their high-maintenance animals. The result is a record-high number of horses who suffer from neglect or starvation. Some are even being sent to slaughter...

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The Emergency Animal Rescue Fund is a continuing, dedicated fund that enables the Humane Society of the United States to help animals impacted by natural disasters or otherwise in need of urgent rescue. The fund supports our rescue and relief efforts for past, present and future emergencies such as...

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