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Plant-based eating benefits people, animals and the planet.

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Vegetable scene of a cauliflower and blackberry lamb on a potato and broccoli landscape with a cucumber whale swimming in a blueberry ocean.

We are alive at a pivotal moment: For ourselves, for the Earth and for every animal on the planet. If we all are to survive, we must change the way we eat. Which sounds dire. But it is within our grasp. Think of it as a chance for a better world. A great and shared adventure. A journey to a place...

Article
By Karen E. Lange
Two deer in a landscaped yard.

Last summer, deer snipped the tops off goldenrods and helped themselves to swamp milkweed buds. They had wild lettuces for breakfast and black raspberries for dessert. Despite the diverse tasting menus on offer, most plants in my garden didn’t tempt these gentle herbivores, who sampled purpletop...

Article
BY NANCY LAWSON, AUTHOR OF THE HUMANE GARDENER
Monarch butterfly in flowers

The suspect creeping up near my front fence was a tough character—broad-leafed and thick-stemmed and threatening to invade my property and swallow it whole if I didn’t act fast. There was no hesitation that summer morning as I headed to work: Off with his head! It was a decision made all too easy by...

Article
BY NANCY LAWSON, AUTHOR OF THE HUMANE GARDENER
Photo illustration of a farm scene using plant-based nuggets and condiments as design elements

Around 2014, Kristie Middleton walked through a cafeteria at the University of California, hoping to see students chowing down on some of the healthy plant-based options she was encouraging food service providers to adopt. Middleton, then with the Humane Society of the United States, figured that...

Article
by Karen E. Lange
With your help, we fight the big fights, working to end all forms of animal cruelty and achieve the vision behind our name: A humane society.
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What do the largest denominations and faiths in the United States say about animals?

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The following statements of policy have been prepared by the professional staff of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and were approved by its Board of Directors on October 22, 2005. These statements express the values and positions of the HSUS on a wide range of issues involving human...

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Crows may be intelligent because, like us and other smart species, they are very social. The groups of crows in your backyard are extended families who share food and look out for each other. Some young crows help their parents care for younger siblings before breeding themselves. Crows work...

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Wild Neighbors (adapted from the book)
Band of wild horses

Editor's Note: After this story was originally published, it was brought to our attention that some of the language could be interpreted differently than intended. The HSUS does not believe that wild horses are overpopulated, and the story's subtitle has been revised to remove the word...

Article
Karen E. Lange

WASHINGTON - The Humane Society of the United States announces the winners of the 33nrd annual Genesis Awards. The awards honor news and entertainment media for outstanding reporting and creative portrayals of animal protection issues in 2018. The winners, across the 15 award categories, include...

Press Release

There are many different kinds of sparrows in North America. But, the house sparrow—the little brown bird we see hopping boldly on city streets—is the most widespread and most often in conflict with people. In fact, house sparrows are one of the most widespread animals on this planet. Likely this is...

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Adapted from the book Wild Neighbors

Every day, more and more wildlife habitat is lost to the spread of development. Give a little back by building your own humane backyard! It doesn't matter whether you have a small apartment balcony, a townhouse with a sliver of ground, a suburban yard, a sprawling corporate property or a community...

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Bats hanging upside down in a cage at a wildlife market in Indonesia to be sold for food

In March, as people struggled to understand how the precursor of the virus that causes COVID-19 emerged from horseshoe bats in southern China and reached humans in the central city of Wuhan, Humane Society International policy specialist Peter Li fielded one question again and again: “Why do Chinese...

Article
By Karen E. Lange
A Veterinarian treats a dog rescued from the China dog meat trade.

WARNING: The following story contains graphic content. Editor's note | May 20, 2016: Since this article first published, activists have continued to go to Yulin to protest its annual dog meat festival and rescue dogs. A recent HSI investigation revealed that about 300 dogs are killed each day in the...

Article
Karen E. Lange